Ed Razek, Chief Marketing Officer of Victoria’s Secret’s parent company L Brands, has been feeling the heat following his controversial casting remarks made in an interview with Vogue magazine.

He revealed that the reason Victoria’s Secret does not cast transsexuals or plus-size models at its annual show is because the event is meant to be “a fantasy.”

Though Heidi Zak, co-founder of lingerie brand ThirdLove, responded to Razek’s comments on Instagram, it seems she had much more to voice out, apparently enough to fill up a full page ad in The New York Times.

ThirdLove shared the ad on Instagram, where the headline reads, “An Open Letter to Victoria’s Secret.” The content of the letter was included with the caption, “Dear Victoria’s Secret, I was appalled when I saw the demeaning comments about women your Chief Marketing Officer, Ed Razek, made to Vogue last week.”

The message continues, “I’ve read and reread the interview at least 20 times, and each time I read it I’m even angrier. How in 2018 can the CMO of any public company—let alone one that claims to be for women—make such shocking, derogatory statements?”

The co-founder called out Victoria’s Secret’s poor marketing approach, which ignores the lives of regular women and its poor inclusion of diversity.

“Your show may be a ‘fantasy’ but we live in reality. Our reality is that women wear bras in real life as they go to work, breastfeed their children, play sports, care for ailing parents, and serve their country.”

Zak continues on to clarify, “ThirdLove is the antithesis of Victoria’s Secret. We believe the future is building a brand for every woman, regardless of her shape, size, age, ethnicity, gender identity, or sexual orientation. This shouldn’t be seen as groundbreaking, it should be the norm. Let’s listen to women. Let’s respect their intelligence. Let’s exceed their expectations. Let women define themselves.”

Razek issued an apology after his insensitive comment about transgender models sparked backlash from readers. Following Razek’s comments, Victoria’s Secret’s CEO Jan Singer stepped down from the company.

View this post on Instagram

Thanks for the headline @vogue (full article link in bio). Over the past week there has been a lot of talk about embracing inclusivity and diversity, or not. In light of these conversations, we just wanted to say: we see you, we hear you, and that’s why @davespector and I founded ThirdLove. Over the last five years, our team at @thirdlove has been dedicated to building a product that allows women of all shapes and sizes to feel good, and look good. With you in mind, we introduced 74 sizes (and were the first to launch half sizes). This last September, we launched our #ToEachHerOwn campaign to celebrate body diversity and individuality. Because we know beauty comes in all shapes and sizes, and refuse to settle for less. We probably weren’t your first love, but we’ll be your last.

A post shared by Heidi Zak, Co-CEO ThirdLove (@heidi) on

View this post on Instagram

New York Times Sunday, full page letter from @heidi to @victoriassecret – Dear Victoria’s Secret, I was appalled when I saw the demeaning comments about women your Chief Marketing Officer, Ed Razek, made to Vogue last week. As hard as it is to believe, he said the following: “We attempted to do a television special for plus-sizes [in 2000]. No one had any interest in it, still don’t.” “It’s like, why doesn’t your show do this? Shouldn’t you have transsexuals in the show? No. No, I don’t think we should. Well, why not? Because the show is a fantasy.” I’ve read and re-read the interview at least 20 times, and each time I read it I’m even angrier. How in 2018 can the CMO of any public company — let alone one that claims to be for women — make such shocking, derogatory statements? You market to men and sell a male fantasy to women. But at ThirdLove, we think beyond, as you said, a “42-minute entertainment special.” Your show may be a “fantasy” but we live in reality. Our reality is that women wear bras in real life as they go to work, breastfeed their children, play sports, care for ailing parents, and serve their country. Haven’t we moved beyond outdated ideas of femininity and gender roles? It’s time to stop telling women what makes them sexy — let us decide. We’re done with pretending certain sizes don’t exist or aren’t important enough to serve. And please stop insisting that inclusivity is a trend. I founded ThirdLove five years ago because it was time to create a better option. ThirdLove is the antithesis of Victoria’s Secret. We believe the future is building a brand for every woman, regardless of her shape, size, age, ethnicity, gender identity, or sexual orientation. This shouldn’t be seen as groundbreaking, it should be the norm. Let’s listen to women. Let’s respect their intelligence. Let’s exceed their expectations. Let women define themselves. As you said Ed, “We’re nobody’s ThirdLove, we’re their first love.” We are flattered for the mention, but let me be clear: we may not have been a woman’s first love but we will be her last. To all women everywhere, we see you, and we hear you. Your reality is enough. To each, her own. -Heidi @heidi

A post shared by ThirdLove (@thirdlove) on

[via Allure, opening image via ThirdLove]

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